A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Over the counter drugs information





OTC (Over the Counter) Drug Database

12/15/2014
04:14 | Author: Evan Martin

Over the counter drugs information
OTC (Over the Counter) Drug Database

Detailed information about over the counter medications. Usage, warnings, dosage and directions.

Examples: Tylenol, ibuprofen, etc.

An OTC drug monograph is established for each class of product. The U.S. The monograph contains acceptable ingredients, doses, formulations, and labeling. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Division of Drug Information (CDER) evaluates and reviews OTC ingredients and labels. Those OTC products that do not conform to an OTC monograph must undergo approval through the New Drug Approval System.

Comments (1)Read more



Over-the-Counter Medicines - National Library of Medicine

10/14/2014
02:32 | Author: Evan Martin

Over the counter drugs information
Over-the-Counter Medicines - National Library of Medicine

Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are drugs you can buy without a prescription. Be MedWise Quiz(National Council on Patient Information and Education).

In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration decides whether a medicine is safe enough to sell over-the-counter. Others cause problems for people with certain medical conditions. Taking OTC medicines still has risks. Some interact with other medicines, supplements, foods or drinks. If you're pregnant, talk to your health care provider before taking any medicines.

Food and Drug Administration.

Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated on 8 October 2014 Topic last reviewed 13 March 2014. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Disclaimers Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players U.S.

You should never take OTC medicines longer or in higher doses than the label recommends. More medicine does not necessarily mean better. It is important to take medicines correctly, and be careful when giving them to children. If your symptoms don't go away, it's a clear signal that it's time to see your healthcare provider.

Some prevent or cure diseases, like tooth decay and athlete's foot. Some OTC medicines relieve aches, pains and itches. Others help manage recurring problems, like migraines. Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are drugs you can buy without a prescription.

Mobile version Get updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us on Twitter.

References and abstracts from MEDLINE/PubMed (National Library of Medicine).

Comments (0)

Over-the-counter Products

8/13/2014
12:02 | Author: Caitlin White

Over the counter drugs information
Over-the-counter Products

-- health information for the whole family There is an over-the-counter medicine for almost anything that ails you – from pain relievers to cough.

How to Read an OTC Drug Facts Label.

Financial support provided by:

Herbal Products and Supplements.

OTC Cough and Cold Medicines and My Child.

Antiemetic Medicines for Nausea and Vomiting Antihistamines Decongestants Laxatives Pain Relievers Melatonin Echinacea.

How to Give Your Child Medicine.

Drug-Nutrient Interactions and Drug-Supplement Interactions.

Dos and Don’ts of Giving OTC Cough and Cold Medicines to Your Child Cough Medicines.

OTC Medicines and Pregnancy.

OTC Medicines: Know Your Risks and Reduce Them.

This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

Antacids and Acid Reducers Antidiarrheal Medicines.

Getting the Most from Your OTC Medicine.

There is an over-the-counter medicine for almost anything that ails you – from pain relievers to cough and cold treatments to vitamins and minerals. Learn how to take your over-the-counter medicines safely, how to avoid side effects or potential interactions, and how to get the most from your medicine.

Comments (0)

Over-the-counter drug - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

6/12/2014
02:16 | Author: Devin Garcia

Over the counter drugs information
Over-the-counter drug - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs are medicines sold directly to a consumer without a. Drug Facts labels include information on the product's active ingredient(s).

In the United Kingdom, it was announced In February 2007, that Boots the Chemist would try over-the-counter sales of Viagra in stores in Manchester, England (previous available as prescription only). Men aged between 30 and 65 would be eligible to buy four tablets after a consultation with a pharmacist.

If it is not appropriate to sell a 'P' medication, i.e., the condition is not suitable for self-management and requires referral to a medical prescriber then a sale should not occur and the pharmacist has a legal and professional obligation to refer this on to an appropriate service.

More recent examples are cimetidine and loratadine in the United States, and ibuprofen (Herron Blue/Nurofen) in Australia.

Comments (4)Read more

Understanding Over-the-Counter Medicines - Food and Drug

4/11/2014
04:10 | Author: Caitlin White

Over the counter drugs information
Understanding Over-the-Counter Medicines - Food and Drug

What are over-the-counter (OTC) drugs and how are they approved? The information in this section will help you, working with your health.

Page Last Updated: 12/16/2013 Note: If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading Viewers and Players.

All these terms refer to medicine that you can buy without a prescription. They are safe and effective when you follow the directions on the label and as directed by your health care professional. Over-the-counter medicine is also known as OTC or nonprescription medicine.

Protecting and Promoting Your Health.

The information in this section will help you, working with your health care professionals, to choose and use over-the-counter medicine wisely.

Comments (0)