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What can tobacco do to you





Smokeless Tobacco - KidsHealth

10/18/2014
07:35 | Author: Kate Thompson

What can tobacco do to you
Smokeless Tobacco - KidsHealth

All you do is slosh it around your mouth and spit out the brown juices every few Chewing tobacco can cause cancer and other problems, just like smoking.

By the 1950s, chewing tobacco had fallen out of favor in most of America and not too many baseball players were spitting big brown gobs all over the infield. Instead of chewing their tobacco, most people were smoking it.

You don't even need to swallow. This sucking and chewing allows nicotine to be absorbed into the bloodstream through the tissues in your mouth. Whether it's snuff or chewing tobacco, you're supposed to let it sit in your mouth and suck on the tobacco juices, spitting often to get rid of the saliva that builds up.

Just like smoking cigarettes, chewing smokeless tobacco can eventually kill you — but not before causing some nasty changes in your body.

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Snorting and chewing snuff was popular in Europe and Scandinavia (the word "snuff" comes from the Scandinavian word "snus").

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Effects of Tobacco Tobacco Free Florida

12/17/2014
05:10 | Author: Caitlin White

What can tobacco do to you
Effects of Tobacco Tobacco Free Florida

How does tobacco affect my health? Every year, we learn more about how devastating tobacco can be to the human body and. Here is how you can do so!.

Department of Health and Human Services. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2004. The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. 6U.S.

Atlanta: U.S. The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General. 9U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2004.

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Tobacco Body

10/16/2014
03:35 | Author: Kate Thompson

What can tobacco do to you
Tobacco Body

See how tobacco changes people. Take a tour around and in the body by pressing the plus and minus symbols. Move the scroll button in the middle of the page.

The non-smoker's breath doesn't smell of tar, and there's no green phlegm being pushed out by a smoker's cough. In Burn magazine's interviews several celebrities revealed they prefer kissing non-smokers.

Hey non-smoking girl, you are on a wonder diet and you don't even know it! Your body shape is closer to the average, whereas research shows that smokers weigh more and are rounder around the abdominal area.

That's why its immunity remains strong against, for example, the Helicobacter pylori that causes peptic ulcers.

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What in tobacco smoke is harmful? - American Cancer Society

8/15/2014
01:00 | Author: Caitlin White

What can tobacco do to you
What in tobacco smoke is harmful? - American Cancer Society

Tobacco smoke is made up of more than 7000 chemicals, including over What can I do to help with any damage that may have been caused by Some of these substances cause heart and lung diseases, too, and all of them can be deadly. You might be surprised to know some of the chemicals found in.

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Cigarettes, cigars, and pipe tobacco are made from dried tobacco leaves, and ingredients are added for flavor and to make smoking more pleasant. The smoke from these products is a complex mixture of chemicals produced by the burning of tobacco and its additives. Tobacco smoke is made up of more than 7,000 chemicals, including over 70 known to cause cancer (carcinogens). You might be surprised to know some of the chemicals found in tobacco smoke include:. Some of these substances cause heart and lung diseases, too, and all of them can be deadly.

These radioactive particles build up in the lungs, and over time can mean a big dose of radiation. But this means that the smoke contains small amounts of radioactive material, too, which smokers take into their lungs as they inhale. This may be another key factor in smokers getting lung cancer. The tobacco leaves used to make cigarettes and cigars contain radioactive materials; the amount depends on the soil the plants were grown in and fertilizers used.

Yes. Smoking also causes cancers of the nasopharynx (upper throat), nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, lip, larynx (voice box), mouth, pharynx (throat), esophagus (swallowing tube), and bladder. It also has been linked to the development of cancers of the pancreas, cervix, ovary, colorectum, kidney, stomach, and some types of leukemia. There is no safe way to use tobacco. It causes 87% of lung cancer deaths in men and 70% in women. Smoking accounts for at least 30% of all cancer deaths in the United States. Cigarettes, cigars, pipes, and spit and other types of smokeless tobacco all cause cancer.

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Tobacco smoke also contains tar and the poison gases carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide. The ingredient that produces the effect people are looking for is nicotine, an addictive drug and one of the harshest chemicals in tobacco smoke.

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What Does Smoking Tobacco Do to Your Body?

6/14/2014
01:15 | Author: Kate Thompson

What can tobacco do to you
What Does Smoking Tobacco Do to Your Body?

Smoking tobacco causes a wide spectrum of health problems and affects many of the major organs in the body. The practice can not only affect.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that smoking is responsible for 90 percent of all lung cancer deaths in American men, and 80 percent in American women. If you smoke, you are two to four times as likely to develop coronary heart disease, two to four times as likely to have a stroke and 12 to 13 times as likely to develop chronic obstructive lung disease. Smoking is also responsible for 90 percent of all deaths from chronic obstructive lung disease.

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