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Sodium retention liver disease





Renal Sodium Retention in Liver Disease

8/21/2014
06:20 | Author: Caitlin White

Sodium retention liver disease
Renal Sodium Retention in Liver Disease

Renal Sodium Retention in Liver Disease. Abstract. These discussions are selected from the weekly staff conferences in the Department of Medicine, University.

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National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA. National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S.

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Warnock, Associate Professor of Medicine, under the direction of Dr Lloyd H. Taken from transcriptions, they are prepared by Drs Homer A. Boushey, Associate Professor of Medicine, and David G. Requests for reprints should be sent to the Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA 94143. Smith, Jr, Professor of Medicine and Chairman of the Department of Medicine. These discussions are selected from the weekly staff conferences in the Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco.

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Renal sodium retention complicating alcoholic liver disease relation

6/20/2014
04:00 | Author: Caitlin White

Sodium retention liver disease
Renal sodium retention complicating alcoholic liver disease relation

The aim of this study was to determine whether liver function and portosystemic shunting are related to renal sodium retention in alcoholic liver disease.

National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA. National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S.

Portosystemic shunt fraction was calculated as the ratio of the intravenous and oral clearances of the isotopes of cholic acid. Patients with ascites had significantly lower elimination rates of all administered compounds as compared with patients without ascites (antipyrine = 0.012 +/- 0.007 vs. Liver function was assessed from the plasma elimination rates of antipyrine, caffeine and stable isotopes of cholic acid, the latter administered both orally and intravenously. However, urinary sodium excretion in patients with ascites was not related to the elimination constants of these compounds (r = 0.360, 0.319, 0.067, -0.073, respectively). Portosystemic shunt fraction was similar in patients with and without ascites (61% +/- 16% vs. 2.284 +/- 0.885/hr, p = 0.005; orally administered cholic acid = 2.178 +/- 0.841 vs. Ascites complicating alcoholic liver disease is associated with impaired liver function but not the extent of portosystemic shunting. 64% +/- 11%) and unrelated to urinary sodium excretion in patients with ascites (r = -0.145). The aim of this study was to determine whether liver function and portosystemic shunting are related to renal sodium retention in alcoholic liver disease. 0.061 +/- 0.041/hr, p less than 0.002; intravenous cholic acid = 1.355 +/- 0.442 vs. 4.056 +/- 1.837/hr, p = 0.007). Twenty-three studies were performed; 10 patients had ascites. 0.031 +/- 0.016/hr, p less than 0.001; caffeine = 0.014 +/- 0.013 vs.

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Cirrhotic Ascites - Cleveland Clinic Center for Continuing Education

4/19/2014
02:00 | Author: Caitlin White

Sodium retention liver disease
Cirrhotic Ascites - Cleveland Clinic Center for Continuing Education

The ultimate effect is sodium and water retention. In the late Portal hypertension is usually caused by liver cirrhosis or, less commonly, outflow obstruction from.

Patients with moderate fluid overload who do not respond to more conservative measures should be considered for pharmacologic therapy. A rapid reduction of ascites is often accomplished simply with the addition of low-dose oral diuretics in the outpatient setting.

If weight loss and natriuresis are inadequate, both drugs can be simultaneously increased after 3 to 5 days to 200mg of spironolactone and 80 mg of furosemide. To maintain normal electrolyte balance, the use of the 100 : 40mg ratio of spironolactone to furosemide is generally recommended.

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Treatment of Sodium Retention in Liver Cirrhosis With

2/18/2014
12:20 | Author: Caitlin White

Sodium retention liver disease
Treatment of Sodium Retention in Liver Cirrhosis With

Accumulation of salt and water in patients with liver disease (so called liver cirrhosis) is possibly related to the increased effect of steroid.

Example: "Heart attack" AND "Los Angeles".

Inclusion Criteria: Exclusion Criteria:. By reducing overall steroid production with the dexamethasone the accumulation of salt and water could be prevented. Accumulation of salt and water in patients with liver disease (so called liver cirrhosis) is possibly related to the increased effect of steroid hormones on salt reabsorption in the kidney.

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The sodium retention of cirrhosis A reappraisal - Wiley Online Library

10/27/2014
08:40 | Author: Caitlin White

Sodium retention liver disease
The sodium retention of cirrhosis A reappraisal - Wiley Online Library

Tions of liver disease that require therapeutic interven- tion and constitute major of the pathogenesis of renal sodium retention has been the introduction and.

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