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Cirrhosis salt retention





Sodium Retention in Heart Failure and Cirrhosis

8/14/2014
02:28 | Author: Caitlin White

Cirrhosis salt retention
Sodium Retention in Heart Failure and Cirrhosis

The resultant renal vasoconstriction and sodium and water retention lead to ascites and hepatorenal syndrome in advanced cirrhosis and cardiorenal syndrome.

Thus, use of natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid antagonists may be a better alternative to reverse diuretic resistance secondary to hyperaldosteronism. Ultrafiltration using either central or peripheral venous access is an attractive option to manage the volume overload in these patients. 54 Despite using intravenous diuretics in 90% of these patients with HF, the average hospitalization for decompensated HF is 4.3 days, with 42% of the patients discharged with unresolved symptoms, 50% losing ≤5 pounds, and 20% gaining weight during the hospitalization.

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Kidney International - Sodium retention in cirrhotic rats is associated

6/13/2014
04:16 | Author: Evan Martin

Cirrhosis salt retention
Kidney International - Sodium retention in cirrhotic rats is associated

These results are consistent with an important role for hyperaldosteronism in the pathogenesis of sodium retention and ascites formation in cirrhosis. In addition.

RNA purity and concentration were assessed spectrophotometrically. RNA integrity was confirmed by inspection of ribosomal RNA bands on ethidium bromide stained agarose gels. Total RNA was extracted from the right kidneys of control and cirrhotic rats as described 16 using RNeasy Mini Kit (Qiagen Inc., Valencia, CA, USA).

Serum creatinine, alanine aminotransferase, total bilirubin, and total protein were determined by standard methods. Serum and urine osmolality were determined from osmometric depression of the freezing point (Osmometer 3300) (Advanced Instruments, Needham Heights, MA, USA), and sodium and potassium concentration by flame photometry (IL-943) (Instrumentation Laboratory, Lexington, MA, USA).

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Liver cirrhosis, hyperaldosteronism, and sodium retention allnurses

4/12/2014
06:24 | Author: Devin Garcia

Cirrhosis salt retention
Liver cirrhosis, hyperaldosteronism, and sodium retention allnurses

When a person has liver cirrhosis, the liver fails to metabolize aldosterone adequay, and the result is hyperaldosteronism with sodium and.

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Discussion - Management of Ascites Caused by Cirrhosis - Common

2/11/2014
08:52 | Author: Evan Martin

Cirrhosis salt retention
Discussion - Management of Ascites Caused by Cirrhosis - Common

In patients who have underlying liver disease, development of fluid retention is a In this setting, the most critical aspect of ascites management is sodium (salt).

As part of the initial plan for managing the patient's ascites, especially refractory ascites, the clinician should determine the patient's Child-Pugh-Turcotte score ( Figure 1 ) and a Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score. The MELD score and, to a lesser extent the Child-Pugh-Turcotte score, serve as strong predictors of 3-month mortality ( Figure 3 ). The MELD score incorporates the patient's age, total bilirubin serum creatinine, and international normalized ratio (INR) for persons age 12 and older ( Figure 2 ), but the actual calculation of the score is complex and requires log scale.

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JCI - SALT RETENTION IN CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER 1

10/20/2014
12:00 | Author: Caitlin White

Cirrhosis salt retention
JCI - SALT RETENTION IN CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER 1

Articles. SALT RETENTION IN CIRRHOSIS OF THE LIVER 1. Allan V. N. Goodyer, Arnold S. Relman, F. Douglas Lawrason2 and Franklin H. Epstein.

Allan V. Relman, F. N. Douglas Lawrason 2 and Franklin H. Goodyer, Arnold S. Epstein.

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1 Aided by a grant from the James Hudson Brown Memorial Fund of the Yale University School of Medicine. Published August 1950.

Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven.

2 James Hudson Brown Research Fellow.

2014 American Society for Clinical Investigation.

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