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Phosphate transport and sensing in saccharomyces cerevisiae





Phosphate transport and sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

11/23/2014
06:25 | Author: Kate Thompson

Phosphate transport and sensing in saccharomyces cerevisiae
Phosphate transport and sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Phosphate transport and sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Wykoff DD, O'Shea EK. Cellular metabolism depends on the appropriate concentration of.

Cellular metabolism depends on the appropriate concentration of intracellular inorganic phosphate; however, little is known about how phosphate concentrations are sensed. These data suggest that PHO84 is not required for sensing phosphate. A synthetic lethal phenotype was observed when five phosphate transporters were inactivated, and the contribution of each transporter to uptake in high phosphate conditions was determined. The similarity of Pho84p, a high-affinity phosphate transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to the glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p has led to the hypothesis that Pho84p is an inorganic phosphate sensor. We determined that pho84Delta cells have a significant defect in phosphate uptake even when grown in high phosphate media. Overexpression of unrelated phosphate transporters or a glycerophosphoinositol transporter in the pho84Delta strain suppresses the PHO5 constitutive phenotype. We further characterized putative phosphate transporters, identifying two new phosphate transporters, PHO90 and PHO91. Finally, a PHO84-dependent compensation response was identified; the abundance of Pho84p at the plasma membrane increases in cells that are defective in other phosphate transporters. We began these studies to determine the role of phosphate transporters in signaling phosphate starvation. Previous experiments demonstrated a defect in phosphate uptake in phosphate-starved pho84Delta cells; however, the pho84Delta strain expresses PHO5 constitutively when grown in phosphate-replete media. Furthermore, pho84Delta strains have defects in phosphate signaling; they constitutively express PHO5, a phosphate starvation-inducible gene.

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Phosphate transport and sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

11/22/2014
04:10 | Author: Caitlin White

Phosphate transport and sensing in saccharomyces cerevisiae
Phosphate transport and sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

The similarity of Pho84p, a high-affinity phosphate transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to the glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p has led to the hypothesis.

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These data suggest that PHO84 is not required for sensing phosphate. Previous experiments demonstrated a defect in phosphate uptake in phosphate-starved pho84Delta cells; however, the pho84Delta strain expresses PHO5 constitutively when grown in phosphate-replete media. Overexpression of unrelated phosphate transporters or a glycerophosphoinositol transporter in the pho84Delta strain suppresses the PHO5 constitutive phenotype. Furthermore, pho84Delta strains have defects in phosphate signaling; they constitutively express PHO5, a phosphate starvation-inducible gene. Finally, a PHO84-dependent compensation response was identified; the abundance of Pho84p at the plasma membrane increases in cells that are defective in other phosphate transporters. We further characterized putative phosphate transporters, identifying two new phosphate transporters, PHO90 and PHO91. Cellular metabolism depends on the appropriate concentration of intracellular inorganic phosphate; however, little is known about how phosphate concentrations are sensed. We began these studies to determine the role of phosphate transporters in signaling phosphate starvation. A synthetic lethal phenotype was observed when five phosphate transporters were inactivated, and the contribution of each transporter to uptake in high phosphate conditions was determined. The similarity of Pho84p, a high-affinity phosphate transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to the glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p has led to the hypothesis that Pho84p is an inorganic phosphate sensor. We determined that pho84Delta cells have a significant defect in phosphate uptake even when grown in high phosphate media.

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA.

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Phosphate homeostasis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the

9/21/2014
02:35 | Author: Kate Thompson

Phosphate uptake
Phosphate homeostasis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the

In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a working model for nutrient homeostasis in Phosphate transport and sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetics.

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The PHO84 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes an

7/20/2014
12:40 | Author: Caitlin White

Phosphate transport and sensing in saccharomyces cerevisiae
The PHO84 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes an

Natural sequence variants of yeast environmental sensors confer cell-to-cell. Phosphate Transport and Sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genetics.

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The PHO84 transcription was regulated by Pi like those of the PHO5, PHO8, and PHO81 genes. Its nucleotide sequence predicted a protein of 596 amino acids with a sequence homologous to that of a superfamily of sugar transporters. A PHO84-lacZ fusion gene produced beta-galactosidase activity under the regulation of Pi, and the activity was suggested to be bound to a membrane fraction. By comparison of nucleotide sequences and by tetrad analysis with GAL80 as a standard, the PHO84 locus was mapped at a site beside the TUB3 locus on the left arm of chromosome XIII. The cloned PH084 DNA restored the Pi transport activity of pho84 mutant cells. A DNA fragment bearing the PHO84 gene was cloned by its ability to complement constitutive synthesis of repressible acid phosphatase of pho84 mutant cells. What's this? What's this?. Hydropathy analysis suggested that the secondary structure of the PHO84 protein consists of two blocks of six transmembrane domains separated by 74 amino acid residues. Gene disruption of PHO84 was not lethal. The PHO84 gene specifies Pi-transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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Phosphate Transport and Sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

5/19/2014
02:35 | Author: Kate Thompson

Phosphate transport and sensing in saccharomyces cerevisiae
Phosphate Transport and Sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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The nuclear exopolyphosphatase of the S. cerevisiae strain deficient in the PPX1 gene. Inactivation of PPX1 encoding the major cytosolic exopolyphosphatase PPX1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae did not alter exopolyphosphatase activity of the isolated nuclei compared with that in the parent strain.

The content. The inactivation of the PPX1 and PPN1 genes, which encode the major enzymes of polyphosphate degradation (exopolyphosphatase and endopolyphosphatase, respectively), was found to exert different effects on the content of different polyphosphates in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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