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Over the counter medication information





Parkinson39s Over-the-Counter Medications - Parkinson39s Disease

11/17/2014
03:04 | Author: Evan Martin

Over the counter medication information
Parkinson39s Over-the-Counter Medications - Parkinson39s Disease

Over-the-Counter Medications. Although there is little conclusive scientific information on natural supplements, researchers are examining several substances to.

Do you have more questions about medications for PD? Ask the experts your questions via or by calling our helpline at (800).

Although there is little conclusive scientific information on natural supplements, researchers are examining several substances to evaluate their effectiveness on slowing Parkinson's disease progression and managing its symptoms.

Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more.

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Before taking any over-the-counter medication, it is very important that a person with Parkinson's discuss the addition of these supplements with their doctor. Over-the-counter medications can and do have side effects and interactions with other drugs. Next: Surgical Treatments. They tend to be expensive and they vary with different manufacturers. Although nutritional supplements have shown some promising results in preliminary studies, it is important to remember that there is not sufficient scientific data to recommend them for Parkinson's disease.

Since there is evidence relating oxidative damage of nerve cells to PD, some researchers are studying antioxidants :

Nutritional supplements are not regulated with the same approval method for prescription drugs, and people with Parkinson's should discuss any medications (prescription or over-the-counter) with a doctor before taking them to avoid potentially dangerous interactions.

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Educating the Older Adult in Over-the-Counter Medication Use

9/16/2014
01:52 | Author: Evan Martin

Over the counter medication information
Educating the Older Adult in Over-the-Counter Medication Use

Abstract. The number of over-the-counter (OTC) medications is increasing as more with information to offer to older adults and their caregivers about safe OTC.

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Over-the-Counter Medications - American Heart Association

7/15/2014
01:28 | Author: Caitlin White

Over the counter medication information
Over-the-Counter Medications - American Heart Association

Decongestants, sodium and other ingredients in over-the-counter Always read the labels on all over-the-counter (OTC) medications,. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:.

This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

*Red Dress DHHS, Go Red AHA ; National Wear Red Day is a registered trademark.

Check the sodium content.

Decongestants may raise your blood pressure.

Many over-the-counter cold and flu preparations contain decongestants such as:. People with high blood pressure should be aware that the use of decongestants may raise blood pressure or interfere with the effectiveness of some prescribed blood pressure medications.

Don't fall for "magic pill" claims.

They may not work as advertised, and they may interfere with other medications. Talk to your healthcare provider before taking any OTC drug or supplement that claims to lower your blood pressure. There are no special pills, vitamins or drinks that can substitute for prescriptions and lifestyle modifications.

Look for warnings to those with high blood pressure and to those who take blood pressure medications. Better yet, if you have high blood pressure and certainly if you are on prescription medication, consult your healthcare professional before taking any over-the-counter medications or supplements. Always read the labels on all over-the-counter (OTC) medications, especially if you have blood pressure of 120/80 mm Hg or greater.

Some OTCs are high in sodium, which can also raise blood pressure. Look at the active and inactive ingredients lists for words like "sodium" or "soda." Note the amount of sodium in the medication. People with high blood pressure should consume less than 1,500 mg of sodium per day from all sources; one dose of some OTCs can contain more than a whole day's allowance.

Keeping track of your medicines can be overwhelming. Learn what you can do to take all your medicines safely and effectively in this free Digi-mag topic supplement from Heart Insight magazine or in PDF format. Or download the Heart Insight magazine iPad app to access along with all of our regular issues.

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CDC - Lice - Head Lice - Treatment

5/14/2014
03:24 | Author: Devin Garcia

Over the counter medication information
CDC - Lice - Head Lice - Treatment

Education and information about head lice, head lice treatment, and pediculosis. Over-the-counter Medications; Prescription Medications.

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Many head lice medications are available "Over-the-counter" without a prescription at a local drug store or pharmacy. If crawling lice are still seen after a full course of treatment contact your health care provider. Each Over-the-counter product approved by the FDA for the treatment of head lice contains one of the following active ingredients.

Malathion lotion, 0.5%; Brand name product: Ovide*

*Use of trade names is for identification purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the Public Health Service or by the U.S.

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DEEP Disposing of Prescription Medicines and Over-the-Counter

3/13/2014
05:40 | Author: Caitlin White

Over the counter medication information
DEEP Disposing of Prescription Medicines and Over-the-Counter

Do not flush prescription medicines or OTC products down the sink or toilet! Contact vendors directly to purchase a product or to obtain more information.

Follow the disposal instructions and put them in the trash. In CT, most of our trash is burned at Resource Recovery Facilities at high temperatures which destroy these products.

(Needles or liquid medications are not accepted.) Check with your local police department to see if they are participating. Some police stations are participating in a Drop Box Drug Disposal pilot program with the Dept. Residents do not need to complete forms or answer questions about the items they drop off. Residents can discard their unwanted or unused medicines in special locked boxes any time the police department lobby is open.

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