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Mayo high cholesterol





High cholesterol Definition - Diseases and Conditions - Mayo Clinic

9/11/2014
02:15 | Author: Kate Thompson

Mayo high cholesterol
High cholesterol Definition - Diseases and Conditions - Mayo Clinic

When you have high cholesterol, you may develop fatty deposits in your blood vessels. Eventually, these deposits make it difficult for enough blood to flow.

When you have high cholesterol, you may develop fatty deposits in your blood vessels. Your heart may not get as much oxygen-rich blood as it needs, which increases the risk of a heart attack. Decreased blood flow to your brain can cause a stroke. Eventually, these deposits make it difficult for enough blood to flow through your arteries.

High cholesterol (hypercholesterolemia) can be inherited, but it's often the result of unhealthy lifestyle choices, and thus preventable and treatable. A healthy diet, regular exercise and sometimes medication can go a long way toward reducing high cholesterol.

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While your body needs cholesterol to continue building healthy cells, having high cholesterol can increase your risk of heart disease. Cholesterol is a waxy substance that's found in the fats (lipids) in your blood.

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Cholesterol levels What numbers should you aim for? - Mayo Clinic

7/10/2014
12:10 | Author: Caitlin White

Mayo high cholesterol
Cholesterol levels What numbers should you aim for? - Mayo Clinic

If you're at very high risk of heart disease, you may need to aim for an LDL level below 70 mg/dL (1.8 mmol/L). In general, the lower your LDL cholesterol level is.

Canada and most European countries measure cholesterol in millimoles (mmol) per liter (L) of blood. Consider these general guidelines when you get your cholesterol test (lipid panel or lipid profile) results to see if your cholesterol falls in an ideal range. Cholesterol levels are measured in milligrams (mg) of cholesterol per deciliter (dL) of blood in the United States and some other countries.

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A blood test to check cholesterol levels — called a lipid panel or lipid profile — typically reports:

High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is known as "good" cholesterol because it helps prevent arteries from becoming clogged.

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Cholesterol Top five foods to lower your numbers - Mayo Clinic

5/9/2014
02:15 | Author: Kate Thompson

Mayo high cholesterol
Cholesterol Top five foods to lower your numbers - Mayo Clinic

Oatmeal, oat bran and high-fiber foods. Oatmeal contains soluble fiber, which reduces your low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the "bad," cholesterol. Soluble fiber is.

The highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids are in:. The American Heart Association recommends eating at least two servings of fish a week.

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Top 5 lifestyle changes to reduce cholesterol - Mayo Clinic

3/8/2014
04:00 | Author: Caitlin White

Mayo high cholesterol
Top 5 lifestyle changes to reduce cholesterol - Mayo Clinic

High cholesterol increases your risk of heart disease and heart attacks. You can reduce cholesterol with medications, but if you'd rather make lifestyle changes.

Even if you have years of unhealthy eating under your belt, making a few changes in your diet can reduce cholesterol and improve your heart health.

Just be sure that you can keep up the changes you decide to make. Better yet, moderate physical activity can help raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, the "good" cholesterol. With your doctor's OK, work up to at least 30 minutes of exercise a day. Whether you're overweight or not, exercise can reduce cholesterol. Remember that adding physical activity, even in 10-minute intervals several times a day, can help you begin to lose weight.

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High cholesterol In-Depth - Diseases and Conditions - Mayo Clinic

1/7/2014
06:35 | Author: Kate Thompson

Mayo high cholesterol
High cholesterol In-Depth - Diseases and Conditions - Mayo Clinic

High cholesterol — Comprehensive overview covers diet, medication and other treatments to lower cholesterol.

Give your diet a healthy kick with these Mediterranean recipes.

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Here are five foods that can lower your cholesterol and protect your heart. You don't always need to take medication to lower your cholesterol.

Reducing your cholesterol doesn't always mean you have to take medications.

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