A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

New drug called crocodile





Desomorphine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

11/15/2014
02:21 | Author: Cole Thomas

New drug called crocodile
Desomorphine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The large volume of tissue damage/infection is what gained the drug its. The Constitution of the So-Called α-Dihydrodesoxycodeine: Bis-Dihydrodesoxycodeine". ""Crocodile" – new dangerous designer drug of abuse from the East".

Desomorphine ( dihydrodesoxymorphine, former brand name Permonid, street name krokodil ) is a derivative of morphine with powerful, fast-acting opioid effects, such as sedation and analgesia. First synthesized in 1932 and patented in 1934, desomorphine was used in Switzerland under the brand name Permonid and was described as having a fast onset and a short duration of action, with relatively little nausea or respiratory depression compared to equivalent doses of morphine. Dose-by-dose it is eight to ten times more potent than morphine.

More generally, this study demonstrated the application of novel methods used by policy makers to both monitor illicit drug use and influence drug policy decision making.

Comments (1)Read more



Krokodil, The Flesh-Eating Street Drug That Rots Skin From Inside

11/14/2014
12:18 | Author: Caitlin White

New drug called crocodile
Krokodil, The Flesh-Eating Street Drug That Rots Skin From Inside

It's called "the most horrible drug in the world" -- and it's come to Illinois. Krokodil, Molly and more: 5 wretched new street drugs | Fox News.

“As of late as last week, the first cases – a few people in Utah and Arizona – were reported to have been using the heroin-like drug, which rots the skin from the inside out,” Singala said in a Tuesday press release. The smell of rotten flesh permeates the room. " It is a horrific way to get sick. Intensive treatment and skin grafts are required, but they often are not enough to save limbs or lives.”.

The deadly effects from illicit version of the painkiller, however, stem from the substances Forbes says "amateur chemists" don't properly remove.

It's called "the most horrible drug in the world" -- and it's come to Illinois.

What is krokodil? The flesh-rotting drug comes to the U.S.

Comments (2)Read more

Krokodil, Flesh-Eating Drug, Reported In Arizona (GRAPHIC VIDEO)

9/13/2014
02:23 | Author: Christina Harris

New drug called crocodile
Krokodil, Flesh-Eating Drug, Reported In Arizona (GRAPHIC VIDEO)

A homemade drug that causes severe damage to the flesh of those who use it has reportedly shown up in the U.S. Previously reported in.

According to doctors at Banner Poison Control Center, two cases of the drug have been reported in the state in the past week.

Krokodil: Flesh Eating Drug Reported In Arizona.

Previously reported in Russia, Krokodil, a disfiguring and potentially lethal mixture of codeine and hydrocarbons such as oil, paint thinner, gasoline or alcohol, has made its way to Arizona.

The Drug Enforcement Administration has monitored krokodil -- also known as desomorphine -- since 2011. Also on HuffPost:.

* Type the words below so we know you are not a cyborg.

Although LoVecchio said users believe the process removes the impurities, they are wrong. Users filter and boil the drug before injecting it.

First cases of flesh-eating drug reported in AZ.

A homemade drug that causes severe damage to the flesh of those who use it has reportedly shown up in the U.S.

Once injected, the drug causes damage to blood vessels and tissue, causing flesh to rot from the inside out. The horrific sores that some users develop resemble crocodile skin, which lends the street drug its name. The average life expectancy of a krokodil user is about three years, according to KSAZ.

We're extremely frightened," Dr. Frank LoVecchio, the co-medical director at the center, told KLTV. “As far as I know, these are the first cases in the United States that are reported.

Disturbing images of the drug's grisly side-effects have been reported before. The images are said to have originated in Russia, where between a few hundred thousand and a million people injected the drug in 2010, according to Time.

He believes that the two cases in Arizona may be related, according to Gawker. LoVecchio told KLTV that the main attraction to the drug is the cost: It is reportedly 20 times cheaper than heroin, but produces a similar high.

Get top stories and blog posts ed to me each day.

Comments (0)

Krokodil, a flesh-eating street drug, is in Canada, reports suggest

7/12/2014
04:56 | Author: Evan Martin

New drug called crocodile
Krokodil, a flesh-eating street drug, is in Canada, reports suggest

It's called “Krokodil,” a flesh-eating drug that's allegedly on the streets of according to the New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance.

Last month, CNN said the drug was in the U.S. – five people were hospitalized in a Chicago suburb as similar cases popped up in Arizona and Oklahoma.

Continue reading →. In order to keep your furnace working to its optimal performance you need to either change or clean your furnace filter on a regular basis. But choosing the right filter is not as easy as it sounds.

Carmen Chai is a national reporter covering health and education for.

A local news team in Seattle got the scare of a lifetime when they arrived on the scene of an early-morning car accident – only to be almost flattened by an out-of-control semi truck.

Comments (4)Read more

Krokodil, Molly, and K2 Drug Facts - WebMD

5/11/2014
06:55 | Author: Kate Thompson

New drug called crocodile
Krokodil, Molly, and K2 Drug Facts - WebMD

Recreational Drugs: 3 New Threats to Know About When it first came out, it was a pure form of a banned drug called MDMA or Ecstasy, which is known for.

With a WebMD Account you can:

If you select "Keep me signed in on this computer", you can stay signed in to on this computer for up to 2 weeks or until you sign out. You should never select this option if you're using a publicly accessible computer, or if you're sharing a computer with others. This means that a cookie will stay on your computer even when you exit or close your browser which may reduce your levels of privacy and security. Even if you select this option there are some features of our site that still require you to log in for privacy reasons.

Health concern on your mind?

Between 5% and 7% of high-schoolers have tried what they thought was Molly, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Comments (5)Read more